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Posts tagged ‘Home Financing’

Mortgage Points

If you have ever gone looking for quotes on a mortgage in order to find out just what a mortgage might cost you, you have probably had the term points thrown at you. So what are points?

Each point is a fee and it is based on one percent of the total amount of the loan. There are a couple of different points, there are discount points and then there are origination points and lenders do not all charge the same amount of these points. Some lenders will charge you one point while others may charge you three.

Discount points are the points that are like prepaid interest on your loan that you are getting for your new home. Every point that you purchase will lower your interest rate to some extent. Most borrowers will be able to choose just how many points they want to purchase. There is a limit of course, usually around four points. The number of points that you choose to buy will depend on how much you want to lower you interest rate. One especially good point of these points is the fact that they are tax-deductible.

Origination fees are different. These fees are used in order to pay for the costs of giving you the loan in the first place. You don’t get anything out of these points so most borrowers don’t like them as they are not even tax-deductible. If you can try to get a loan that does not require you to get these types of points. Discount points on the other hand can be useful to you.

The choices that you make concerning the points to get will be affected by a couple of different things. For example, how long are you going to be living in this house? And how much of a down payment are you going to be putting down? If you are thinking of settling into this house for the long haul then perhaps discount points are a good way for you to go. Lowering your interest rate for years to come is always a good thing. Before making your decision take stock of your situation and see what suits your needs best.

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Who Is Responsible For Closing Costs

Buying or selling a home is a euphoric experience for both of the parties involved. This euphoria can cool when you learn which party is responsible for the closing costs.

Who Is Responsible For Closing Costs

When looking to buy or sell a home, every person eventually arrives at the question of funding closing costs on the transaction. To put it simply, both buyers and sellers typically are responsible for some of the closing costs. However, the exact amounts paid can vary significantly from area to area and depending on what agreements the buyers and sellers come to in the offer-counteroffer process.

It is important to research the area you are looking to buy or sell in and be knowledgeable regarding any laws and standards of practice for the area. Yes, the requirements are different in each state and often each city. Know what you will have to pay ahead of time so you can be prepared to cover these costs. Here are some examples of what buyers and sellers generally have to cover.

Buyers typically pay the following: fees charged for obtaining a mortgage; inspection fees; homeowner’s insurance (must be prepaid for one year at closing); transfer taxes if there are any (although the seller may pay these or they may be shared 50-50 between buyer and seller); title insurance and escrow fees (varies depending on the location); and attorney’s fees (if and where attorneys are involved in the transaction). If you are confused, a mortgage broker can tell you which fees are customarily paid for by the buyer in your area and how much they will cost. When buying a home, the use of mortgage brokers is highly recommended to both get a great deal on a mortgage and help with the transaction itself. The broker only gets paid if the deal goes through, so you know they will make every effort.

Sellers’ closing expense responsibilities typically include: loan payoff fees; the real estate commission (in some cases, a portion of this may be paid by the buyer); title insurance (depending on the location); termite repairs (this is negotiable in some areas); cash payments in lieu of repairs to the property; all or part of transfer taxes and escrow fees, if there are any; attorney’s fees where applicable; and other fees set by local custom or negotiated during the transaction.

Knowing and researching the area you are buying or selling in is critical to understanding who is responsible for closing costs. Educate yourself and you will avoid overpaying.

Your Options in Car Financing

There are so many car financing options available how do you know which one is right for you? Read on to obtain information about all of the different options available and how to determine which one will provide you with the best benefits.

Many people take advantage of an option known as dealer financing. This is when you handle the financing of your new vehicle directly through the lender. Now, that doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be making your payments directly to the dealer. Usually, they work with a finance company to provide the financing to you. There are definitely some benefits to this option. First, depending on your situation you may be able to obtain extremely low-interest rates; in some case you may be able to obtain a zero percent interest rate. In order to obtain this special rate; however, you will need to have excellent credit with no problems. If you have any problems at all on your credit history you will not qualify for the special interest rate although you will probably be able to still obtain a loan; just at a higher rate. When your credit report is not perfect ask yourself whether you could get a better deal at a bank.

Bank financing is an option that is typically available as long as your credit history is good. This means it doesn’t have to be perfect but you shouldn’t have any major flaws either. If you have already worked with the bank in the past this will increase your chances of obtaining a loan. While a bank interest rate may not be as low as what a car dealer can offer for individuals with excellent credit, it may be better than what you could obtain at the dealership if your credit is only ‘good.’

Another option you may wish to consider is credit union financing. Of course, this option is only available if you belong to a credit union. If you do happen to have a credit union membership; however, the rate available to you may be much better than what you can obtain through a bank or dealership.

These days it is also quite easy to simply go online and surf around for a quote from an online lender. This option has become so popular many lenders are now willing to compete with one another and offer very attractive rates. In the event you do not have perfect credit, this can be a good option for you; just make sure you fully understand all of the terms of the loan before accepting it.

Another option would be to simply borrow the funds from a family member of friend. Of course, this is extremely risky because it could cause problems in your relationship in the event that you run into a problem with the payments. But, if you can’t obtain a loan elsewhere because of credit problems this may be a good option.

Finally, you may wish to consider refinancing your home or taking out a home equity loan in order to finance the cost of your new home. This basically allows you to pay cash for your vehicle with the proceeds of the loan and then paying back the money through the refi loan. In some cases you may be able to get a better interest rate with this route than you would with a traditional bank auto loan. In addition, the interest you pay on the loan is tax-deductible. Like other options; however, there are some disadvantages. With this option, be aware that you could be putting your house at risk, not just your car, if you run into a problem and can’t make the payments in the future.

For Sale By Owner: Pre-qualifying A Buyer

A big issue and pressing question for a lot of For Sale By Owner sellers is how to determine if a potential buyer can afford to purchase the home for sale. This situation is known as pre-qualifying a buyer. At first glance, this may seem like a complicated process and a complex dilemma but in actuality it is relatively simple and involves crunching a few numbers in some basic mathematic equations.

 

It is important to determine the meaning of some terms that are involved in this process. The first term to understand is the acronym PITI. This stands for Principle, Interest, Taxes, and Insurance. This is a figure that represents the total cost, monthly, of the mortgage payment including principal and interest as well as the monthly cost of property taxes and homeowners insurance. The second term is Ratio. This is a number that most banks use in order to determine how much of a buyer’s monthly gross income they can afford to spend on PITI. The most commonly used ratio is twenty-eight per cent. This ratio is determined without considering any other debts such as credit cards or car payments. Sometimes this ratio is referred to as the front-end ratio. When other monthly debt is taken into consideration, a ratio of thirty-six to forty per cent is acceptable. This is called the back-end ratio.

 

The calculations are as follows:  the front-end ratio is determined by dividing the PITI by the gross monthly income. The back end ratio is determined by dividing the PITI combined with the debt, by the gross monthly income. Four things are needed in order to determine the PITI. The sales price, the mortgage amount, annual taxes, and annual hazard insurance. From the sales price you must subtract the down payment in order to determine how much is needed from your bank.

 

The mortgage amount is generally the sales price minus the down payment. To determine the principal and interest portion of the payment you must use a mortgage payment calculator and input the loan amount, the interest rate, and the term of the loan in years. Mortgage calculator websites are available and can be found without much difficulty. Annual taxes are divided by twelve in order to determine the monthly property tax payment. The annual hazard insurance must be divided by twelve in order to come up with the monthly property insurance payment.

 

All of these terms and figures seem daunting, but once put into practice, things become easier and more self-explanatory. This is the most complex portion of pre-qualifying your buyer. Other requirements include the standard credit check and job history check. A good credit rating as well as at least two years of consecutive employment are usually necessary in order to get the best terms for a mortgage and to get the lowest interest rate possible.

 

It is not as difficult as it sounds in order to pre-qualify a buyer. This can usually be determined by a simple conversation where figures are discussed. With a small amount of due diligence, this process can be much simpler than it sounds and a profitable transaction can be completed.

Home Finance – 20 Questions For Your Lender

Warning! Home finance has blossomed into an incredibly diverse and complicated industry. This is good and bad. There are at least a hundred ways to borrow the money for your next home now. There are also dozens of ways for lenders to take advantage of you, from hidden charges to prepayment penalties and more.

Let your lender explain all the various home loans and home finance options available. However, when you finally decide on a product you like, ask as many of the following as are relevant to your loan. These are the questions that will protect you.

Home Finance – Questions For The Lender

– What is the interest rate?

– What is the APR (annual percentage rate; includes fees, points and mortgage insurance)?

– What is the initial rate (if it is an ARM – adjustable rate mortgage)?

– What is the highest the rate can go to next year (ARM)?

– What are the annual and lifetime caps on the interest rate and payment (ARM)?

– How often is the rate or payment adjusted, and when (ARM)?

– What index is the rate based on (ARM)?

– What margin is added to the index (ARM – it might be the index plus 3%, for example)?

– Is credit life insurance required (this pays off the loan if you die)?

– How much would the payment be without it?

– Can any of the fees or costs be waived?

– Is there a prepayment penalty?

– How much is the prepayment penalty?

– For how long is the penalty in force?

– Are extra principle payments allowed?

– Is an interest rate lock-in available? (guarantees interest rate for a time)

– Can I have the lock-in in writing?

– Is the rate locked in at time of application or time of approval?

– If rates drop, can I get a lower rate locked-in?

– What inspections and/or surveys are required?

– Is a title search and/or title insurance required, and what is the cost?

– Can I get an estimate of prepaid amounts that I’ll have to pay at closing?

– Are there “points,” and what will these cost (discount points to reduce interest rate)?

– What state taxes, local taxes, stamp taxes and transfer taxes will I have to pay?

– Will a flood determination be required (to see if the home needs flood insurance)?

– What other costs will there be?

– Is there anything else I should know?

Lenders may not like getting two dozen questions thrown at them, but you have a right to ask before you agree to a loan. Did you know that a 1% higher interest rate on a $150,000 loan can cost you an extra $30,000 over the years? Home finance can be as important as a good price when it comes to saving money on your home.